Cast Blog: #PROJECTRUNWAY

Grass Is Always Greener

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Kenley Blogs Episodes 510-514

On The Road

The Real Winner

The Final Showdown

Leanne Speaks!

Finale, Part 2

What's Next

Tim Responds To Your Comments!

Love Is In The Hair!

History Repeating Itself

Garden Of Locks

Nature Calls

Rock 'n' Runway

Rock Steady

Rock N' Runway

Suede: Rockin' Out

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Take A Bow

Transformation

Joe: Straight Talk

Working Girl

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Best Of The Best?

Written In The Stars

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What's Your Sign?

I Saw The Sign

A Designer's Dream

Fashion Inside Out

Stella: Lovin' The Leatha

Double 0 Fashion

No Leatha, Mo' Problems

Making The Most Of It

The Fashion That Drives You

A Softer Edge

Fasten Your Seat Belts

Show Some Love

It's All An Illusion

Daniel: Oy Gevalt!

Good Queen Fun

Drama, Drama, Drama!

Joe: All Aboard!

RuPaul: A Drag Race

Grass Is Always Greener

The model's choices really played a big role in this challenge!

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Heidi presents the challenge: Design a cocktail dress with your model as your client. This challenge highlights green textiles; that is, textiles that are environmentally responsible: no synthetics, no poisonous dyes and, when appropriate, organically-grown. I visited MOOD several weeks before this challenge to research the range of textiles available in the category. Admittedly, the range is limited, especially when it comes to color, with many of the textiles being white or ivory. Consequently, many designers dye these textiles, and that gives them infinite custom options. Regrettably, our Project Runway designers would not have time to dye, given that they had one day for this challenge. Making matters a little more complex, the designers' models would do the shopping, and without designer consultations. MOOD tagged all of the green textiles, so they could be easily identified. The models had 30 minutes to shop and a budget of $75. Given that they are not designers, I reminded them that they should purchase closures and color corresponding thread, plus any other notions that they believed would be necessary.

The divine Natalie Portman is our guest judge. Not only is she more than capable of critiquing a cocktail dress, she's an environmental activist with a vegan line of footwear, Té Casan.

Suede WINS! From the perspective of innovation and experimentation, there was no one close to Suede. Astutely, he mitigated the harsh visual impact of the silk/hemp blend textiles by cutting them into bias strips, which he overlapped in seemingly random, but harmonious, patterns. These red and white strips constituted his bodice, while a ballerina skirt in white sat suspended upon an underskirt of tulle. Suede's innovation also embraced high levels of risk-taking; that is, it could have been just as easy for the judges to have lunged and attacked. Instead, they celebrated, as do we. Congratulations, Suede! Wesley is OUT. Wesley, oh, Wesley. I felt so bad for him. Owing to his model's decision-making, he was stuck with a dreary brown silk/hemp blend that does not respond kindly to bold lighting. (It looks best with NO lighting.) But he was not alone by any means. In fact, Leanne and Joe had the exact same fabric. But Wesley tortured the textile while constructing the dress and it showed: uneven seams, an unintentionally sinuous hem and, from my viewpoint, unmatched grain lines in the fabric, which served to exacerbate the inconsistent absorption of light. The look was sloppy and the fit on the model was terrible. Had it not been so egregious, perhaps he could have rallied and defended himself. But rally he didn't. He was like Dorothy in Oz, "I'm Wesley, the meek and innocent." Sadly, Wesley, you're also out.

Blayne lucked out when his model, Polina, arrived from shopping with yards and yards of bubblegum pink, his signature color, fabric. His design -- a one-shoulder mini-dress with a draped sash across the neckline and side panels in black -- looked sexy and youthful and contemporary.

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Daniel designed an adorable mini-dress with capped sleeves and a scooped neckline using a black silk/hemp blend. I found the longer length in the back of the skirt to be a subtle nod to Audrey Hepburn's Sabrina. His design was well-presented and well-executed, but ... it almost didn't happen: Mere minutes before I called time to escort the designers to the runway, he was still sewing, and I mean SEWING!

Emily describes her designs as being "edgy and underground." I don't doubt that, but it has yet to reveal itself. Her design for this challenge was pretty enough -- a navy/midnight pleated mini with a navy and gray woven and ruched bustier -- but I'd love to see her designs demonstrate more risk-taking. Emily, show us that edge! Jennifer created the drapiest (is that a word?) design. I don't know what textile she used to achieve that buoyancy, but it had to have been a jersey of some sort. Her orange and gray palette concerned me, because the colors did not say, "cocktails," nor did the gray apron effect of the front. But perhaps her model Alex was serving cocktails. Then, it would make sense!

Jerell merely flirted with this challenge, at least in my opinion. I know that his designs can have a profound edge, but where was it? He created a halter mini-dress in light blue with a deeper aqua panel insert in the front. The thin side panel of lace eluded me, as did the anemic looking feather trim on the hem. Jerell, please step it up.

Joe designed, uh, um, what? A slip dress? What could be more basic? Did his use of diamante spaghetti straps or the circular insert under the bust assuage me? Hardly. I suppose that the judges were simply relieved that the slip was well constructed and fit his model, Topacia. But considering that he worked with the same textile as Wesley, that may have been enough of an achievement!

Keith designed a halter mini-bubble-dress using the champagne silk/hemp blend textile. You may know that I am not a fan of anything "bubble," but he made it work. His execution of the garment was excellent, the proportions were good, and his model Runa knew how to give it runway appeal. Bravo, Keith! Kelli entered this challenge with immunity from her win of the last challenge, so she knew that she could take risks and be safe. I don't know whether it was risks that she took, other than challenging the boundaries of taste. Her champagne silk skirt was uncontroversial, but that teal top with the champagne ruffles was rather over-the-top in my opinion. Then when all of the asymmetry is folded in, well, you end up with something that's either thought provoking or ... not.

Kenley was among the top three designers in this challenge. The judges responded well to her look: a simple shift in champagne organic silk with a dramatic ruff and a simple black waistband. I feared that the collar was a bit clownish, and I never know which way the judges will lean, so I merely cautioned her to be prepared to defend it. Still, that very basic silhouette needed something! Yes, the dress was basic, but it was also very well-executed.

Korto totally eluded me with her "inside-out dress," as I dubbed it. When I first approached her workspace, I was certain that I was looking at the inside of the dress, replete with darts and seams in process. But, alas, I was wrong. All of that not-very-pretty stuff was on the outside and would remain, intentionally. Egads. I didn't understand. I merely hoped that she could successfully defend her design to the judges.

Leanne overthought and overdesigned. I supported her concept, but when I saw stacks of padded ellipses, I feared that she was going entirely too far. After advising her to step back from her work and consider editing, I let it be. Edit she did not, and I was perplexed to see that all of those ellipses that she applied round and round the mini-dress lay as flat as tissue. The volume that she had aimed to achieve was nowhere in evidence. Stella, and get ready for this, was among the top three designers in this challenge. This is an amazing achievement considering her garbage bag bomb in the last challenge. Amazing! But her design process remained the same: loads of potentially derailing indecision and tons of whining about, "I don't design with stuff like this. I design with leather." Her refined, well-constructed, one-shoulder mini in champagne was an exercise in restraint -- and it worked!

Terri commanded her textile: another silk/hemp blend, but this time in navy. She knew that it was best to keep the design clean: a simple shift. But she opted for exuberance in the neckline and collar where ruffled embellishments made a bold and beautiful statement. Bravo, Terri!

The Final Showdown

Bryant Park was a frantic frenzy backstage but most kept cool.

After weeks of vigorous drawing, designing and sewing, the final three designers arrived at the last challenge. The pressure was on for Leanne, Korto, and Kenley as they geared up to show their collections at Bryant Park for New York Fashion Week!

As the TRESemmé Styling Team entered the fashion tents, we were filled with excitement and anticipation to see what the designers put together. Since each contestant had 10 models each, backstage was buzzing! Kenley was frantic because some of her models were missing and didn't even show up until the last minute. Leanne was the complete opposite - she stayed calm and collected and even had all her models ready to go way before runway time. Korto looked nervous but was ecstatic to be at Bryant Park. She told us it was something she had been dreaming about her whole life. After we gathered the 30 models, we split them up by designer so that the TRESemmé Styling Team could start transforming the girls. Korto's collection reflected her African heritage and culture. To complement the loud prints and bold colors, we decided to give Korto's models an up-do to accentuate the embellished detailing on the neckline of the garments. First, I started by taking a zig-zag section from ear to ear across the crown. I worked in TRESemme Anti-Frizz Secret Smoothing Crème to help create a sleek base. Then, we tied two separate ponytails to the right side of the head within the top and bottom sections. To add volume to the ponytail, we created waves using a 1″ curling iron, and then teased the hair. After, we lightly brushed the surface for a smooth exterior and neatly twisted and pinned the hair into a doughnut-shaped bun.

For Leanne's collection, she found inspiration by the lake near her home in Portland, Oregon. Each piece in her line had some sort of ripple or wave effect to it in different shades of blue and cream. We wanted to create a hairstyle that had a similar wave-like effect. Leanne envisioned the hair to look natural, organic and earthy. I began by generously spraying TRESemmé Thermal Creations Heat Tamer throughout the models' hair. After blow-drying, I gave her models a deep left side part and tied back the front pieces of their hair into a ponytail. I pulled the remaining hair and the ponytail into one low pony and curled it to create soft waves.Kenley designed an assortment of colorful knee-length dresses that she hand painted herself! She wanted the hair to be classic and sophisticated, so we decided to give her models Marcel waves. To get this look, I created a low left side part from above the eye to the crown, then sectioned the hair from the crown to behind the right ear and clipped it aside. Next, I put the remaining hair into a side bun to the right side of the head. After, we released the top section of the hair from the clip and misted the hair with TRESemme Thermal Creations Heat Tamer before blow-drying for a smooth finish. Then, we finished by applying TRESemme Thermal Creations Curl Activator Spray to the front pieces and used a 1" curling iron to create face framing Marcel waves. Finally, we loosely pinned the remaining length of the hair into a bun.

Even though all the collections looked amazing on the runway, there can only be one winner of Project Runway. Tim Gunn, who surprised everyone as the guest judge, thought Leanne's line was uniquely structured and versatile. Heidi said her cohesive collection floated down the runway. The judges all agreed her designs were flawless and Leanne was crowned winner!

It has been such a memorable experience seeing Leanne grow into the designer she is today, and I'm sure we can expect many more beautiful collections from her. I can't wait to see what type of ripple effect this designer will make in the fashion industry!