Rocco DiSpirito

Rocco tells us about his family dinners and his mother's meatballs.

on Jul 1, 2011

After the primo was, of course, secondo. The secondo in an Italian meal is the most like a main course in the U.S., but it's usually a smaller portion than we're used to. Quail, chicken, rabbit, beef, or fish are an ideal secondo.

After that, we always had dolce, or dessert. Dolce is usually very simple in an Italian dinner. (Those elaborate cream pastries in Italian bakeries are usually eaten as mid-morning or afternoon snacks, not with a meal.) Generally it's just fresh fruit from the garden peeled by a grownup or a few biscotti with a cup of strong espresso flavored with zambuco (café corretto). We ate these dishes again and again, and they were woven deeply into our way of life.

Meals in Italy have always been about more than food. The purpose of a traditional Italian dinner is to make everyone in the family feel loved. And so at this dinner party especially, I would be judging the chefs on whether they could make my guests feel cared for and loved. It was the first thing I told them when I explained the theme. Who was listening?

Competing were Ninamarie Bojekian, chef and owner of Ooh LaLa Catering and Events in New Jersey; Fabrizio Carro, executive chef at Quattro in New York City; and Nicola Carro, executive chef at Quattro in Miami. As I'm sure you saw, Fabrizio and Nicola are identical twins and Italian through and through. Both grew up with a passion for cooking and have translated that into stirring up innovative Italian "gastronomia" as they call it at their restaurant, Quattro in Miami.