Rocco DiSpirito

Rocco tells us about his family dinners and his mother's meatballs.

on Jul 1, 2011

Fabrizio -- who is so Italian that at the end of this blog you'll be ordering pasta, listening to some Pavarotti, and saying "Bravo!" and "Ciao!" with an Italian accent -- took a completely different approach. He designed the terrace to look like an Italian garden, complete with fruit trees, herbs, and vines. It was so authentic that I expected Giorgio Armani to be lighting candles and Sophia Loren to be pouring Chianti. I could see that Fabrizio was determined to do it right.

I hosted a lively, fun group of guests last night: Caroline and Albert Manzo, stars of 'The Real Housewives Of New Jersey' and co-owners of the Brownstone; Joey Fatone, former member of *NSYNC; Sara Gore, host of 'Open House' and 'New York Live'; Tammy Pescatelli, comedienne and actress; and Silvano Marchetto, chef and owner of DaSilvano restaurant in New York City.

As I served them wine, Fabrizio and Ninamarie hustled into my kitchen, cooking up what would hopefully be a warm, Italian embrace. Fabrizio went to work with a lot of bravado; I think he was trying to psych out Ninamarie by criticizing her for cooking chicken in mayonnaise. I was perplexed by that choice as well. Mayonnaise doesn't make food tender as Ninamarie claimed; it simply adds fat. 

As I normally do at my dinner parties, I asked if any of my guests had any special dietary requests. Sara spoke up, saying she was on a diet and trying to avoid carbs and fat-laden food. Her request had challenging written all over it. These days we all know someone who's on a low-carb diet, so I wasn't totally surprised. But here's the deal -- Italians love and eat all types of carbs from the minute they're born until the day they die. But how exactly can you have an Italian dinner party without bread and pasta?