Rocco DiSpirito

Rocco DiSpirito explains why both chefs were winners, and reveals set secrets.

on Jun 24, 20110

The theme of last night's dinner party was Mystery Guest. That means, literally, guess who's coming to dinner? No one knew, not the chefs, not the guests -- only the Mystery Guest and me. If you were cooking a dinner party, and your spouse or partner announced to you that a mystery guest was showing up for dinner, wouldn't that throw you into a tailspin? Maybe you'd be pretty pissed off -- not having any idea whether that mystery guest would even like your menu or not. If that happened to me, I'd be frustrated as hell. Well, as you saw, the chefs in last night's competition stayed super-cool, and if they felt any pressure, I sure couldn't tell it. Their ease put me at ease. And man, was that important to me, because above all, I host dinner parties to please others. And if my chefs got nervous, that would spoil the whole experience. But because they were confident, I was confident that my guests would have a great and memorable time. So here we go...

I could barely stay out of the kitchen during prep for last night’s dinner party. I had three very-different chefs competing: King, chef of not one but TWO executive restaurants in New York City –- one is the wonderful Kuma Inn; Michelle, a private chef from Los Angeles; and Joel, a full-time culinary teacher at a high school. All so diverse, which meant big, big drama could unfold.

I mean, here’s Michelle who’s judged every single day by the small groups she cooks for. I was sure she could create something spectacular that would make my guests feel like they’re being treated to a dining experience par excellence. So could King. After all, he is a culinary master and his background proves it. As for Joel, I was really interested in what he could bring to the table. That cliché kept zigzagging around in my head: “Those who can’t… teach.” Not so much because of Joel, but because I was once a teaching assistant at Boston University for a course called “advanced food and beverage management.” I used to get ribbed a lot with that cliché.

Joel was picked on a lot as a kid because he was fat and couldn’t play sports. He learned to cook instead. He said, “If I’m not cooking, I’m not happy.” That kind of passion counts for something. Oddly, all through the challenges Joel thought he was the clear underdog.

On to the signature dish challenge. That would tell me everything I needed to know about them – philosophy, talent, commitment to creating a memorable experience for my guests. If you asked me what I like best about this challenge, I’d say, “tasting.”

King did a stir-fry of beef noodles and sea scallops, a dish his mom made for him growing up. But when it came time to plate up, King’s scallops didn’t make it out of the pan. It was an incomplete dish –- bummer for him –- and me. I wanted to the full experience. Bad timing; I didn’t think he stood a chance. What I did taste though, was pretty damn good. Still made me nervous that he couldn’t get the timing right.

9 comments
Boog
Boog

Very true! Makes a change to see soemnoe spell it out like that. :)

Queendoily
Queendoily

As a home grown Cajun, I was a little insulted at Rocco's comments about how to make a roux. I want to find the idiot in Louisiana who takes 4 hours to make etouffe! Traditional étouffée has a very light and savory sauce. I think Rocco got crawfish étouffée with crawfish bisque.

Cousin Monty
Cousin Monty

I agree that the concept here is an interesting one. Yet, as a rule, when producers over leverage the time conflict ("...you have less that one minute remaining..."), your show drops back into the pack of all other cooking competitions. After so many seasons of Iron Chef, Worst Cooks, Hells Kitchen et. al., haven't we seen enough kitchen panic footage?

The episode with the culinary arts teacher from Connecticut had some interesting content, yet poor Rocco comes off as a very small person; Pretentious, meddling and dismissive. It's sad to see earnest contestants wincing so humbly around Rocco as he oversells the fame and prestige of his guests.

It felt so arbitrary and unfair to see poor King lose last night. I'm like most viewers, irritated by the lower expectations of the humbler and more "folksy" competitor. You can win with bland sausage and an irritating, intrusive party game concept if you represent a "good guy" character who is more appealing to middle America. Watching this is a bit like watching Mr. Sardonicus or The Twighlight Zone, all a vague diversion based on cruel irony. Rocco is really another Real Housewife; tinted, over-styled, playing to the camera, overselling his reality "fame". This is feel bad TV. I can envision Andy Cohen somewhere behind a curtain pulling levers frantically.

hokiepokieshepalepa
hokiepokieshepalepa

I agree with Charlie 2 -- some of the dishes are not the only thing that is falling flat on this show. I just watched it for the 3rd and last time (because the 2nd & 3rd times were the same as the first.) Also, is there a show in store where a female may win?

Jud
Jud

After watching tonight's episode maybe I should go to the prepared foods section and buy my dinner for my guests. Being a chef is someone who MAKES the dishes, not buys them.

FanFare57
FanFare57

From the guests' comments, The "Cooking Teacher's" (I forget his name) best dish was the mussels and clams dish. It was the only one from him that I would have wanted to eat. Whereas King's entire menu looked beautifully presented and well received (except that it was deemed safe). btw: why are Food Network's "Chopped" losers used as talent? (i.e. King lost in that show too).

Charlie2
Charlie2

My husband and I watch a lot of Bravo TV, but we found Rocco very hard to watch because of the way he diminishes the people cooking on his show. He needs to be more clever and more classy if he expects to build an audience.

Viewer 5
Viewer 5

LOVE ROCCO and the new show. I was missing me some ROCCO!