Cynthia Bailey

Cynthia couldn't believe Kenya's behavior during the Jet Magazine open call.

on Nov 5, 2012

Welcome back!

First and foremost, let me say THANK YOU to all of you that have shown me so much love and support. Life is full of ups and downs, and at the end of the day, the only thing that you are left with is your friends, family, and most importantly, God. Your kind words and well wishes are greatly appreciated and are always right on time.

I am so excited to fill you guys in on everything that's been going on in my life. It has been a long time, and so much has happened. I am blessed to say that my family and I are doing great. By the grace of God, we all are in good health and living a happy life. Let me start by saying that my 12-year-old daughter, Noelle, is truly the love of my life. I love that little girl so much that when she is in pain, I am physically sick about it. No mother ever wants to see her child suffer mentally or physically for any reason.

I decided to homeschool Noelle, because she was having some issues in school, not academic but social. The environment for her became one that was spirit-breaking as opposed to spirit-lifting. I know my child very well, and she was not flourishing. It was hard to watch her try to find her own identity, and own who she is. No matter how much love and support she got at home, when she went to school she was torn down. I noticed that her behavior went from confident, strong, smart, and happy to low self-esteem, quiet, withdrawn, and sad. Her eating habits changed, grades dropped, and she started biting her nails uncontrollably. It was heartbreaking, and I felt so helpless. At first, I took the "tough love" approach, and told my child the usual things like, "This is life," "this is how school is," and told her that she has to "stick it out." I had flashbacks of my own childhood issues with bullying and trying to fit in. It was very difficult, and I wanted so badly for my mother to protect me and make it all better. Now as a mother myself, I will go to any lengths to protect my child and family. When it got to the point where I could no longer watch the light go out of the same eyes that used to light up a room, I took Noelle out of school. I was literally dropping her off one morning for school and was kissing her good-bye when I paused for a moment to look at her, and I did not like what I saw. That was it for me, I was done. I told her to get back in the car and took her home. I immediately felt a sense of relief, and guilt left my body. I knew I was doing the right thing. I never had any regrets, and I never looked back. Noelle was home schooled for the rest of the year.