Kenya Moore

Kenya opens up about her experience.

on Feb 12, 2013

I was disappointed when none of my cast mates reached out to me after learning of my ordeal when many viewers did.  Whether or not I am your favorite or least favorite person, the bond that we all have is that we are women first. I’m a woman before I am any other identifying marker such as race, social status, popularity, occupation, or religious background. I am a woman. I am a child of God and I am blessed. With that said, I beg all women to get a mammogram. If you get a call back, GO BACK. BE BRAVE. Early detection is the key to survival.  And do a self-breast examination that can be found at http://on.aol.com/video/how-to-perform-breast-self-exam-286302892. Thank you for allowing me to share my experience with you.

Breast Cancer Generalized
•    An estimated 250,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually
•    Only a small number of new cases have a genetic link (5%) or family history (10-15%)
•    40,000 will die from their disease

Breast Cancer in Black Women
•    Although the incidence of breast cancer is higher among white women, black women are more likely to die from their disease
•    Death rate is 41% higher in black women
•    Black women are three times more likely to have triple negative breast cancer, which makes it more challenging to treat. (More aggressive, poorer prognosis, higher recurrence and reduced survival)
•    Black women have the lowest survival rate of all races

Awareness
•    Awareness has been the focus for 20 years, now it's time to move toward action!
•    Breast cancer typically produces little to no symptoms when detected early, that's why Mammograms are so important, get them starting at age 40 or sooner if there is a family history
•    If you get a call back, make sure your follow up; "Early detection means better protection"