Lee Anne Wong

Lee Anne Wong on the the difficulties of cooking for 60. Oh, and why you must try pig's leg.

on Nov 15, 2006

This round is all about "leftovers." Now I debate calling the Quickfire this, because while unusual and not often eaten by the average American, these parts of the animal are consumed in many countries as a delicacy and mostly because other cultures are less wasteful and use the entire animal.

I myself will try anything three times, and have done so with most of these parts. I have come to love many of them, with the exception of chicken's feet (weird crunchy cartilage...my fellow Chinese cooks at Jean George's 66 used to get a good haha eating them in front of me and watching me squirm). Two hours is not a lot of cooking time, so to choose something like the veal tails to braise is not the wisest choice, especially if you are not using a pressure cooker. Veal tails, a smaller version of oxtails, are absolutely sublime if cooked long enough. The meat is tender and flavorful, and should fall off the bone. Same with pig trotters. Love 'em, but they need quite a long time to cook.

If you ever get a chance to consume what is known as a zampone, I would not pass it up. It is a full pig's leg stuffed with ground meat. You roast and braise it whole, and you traditionally serve it with lentils. Mmmmm, delicious swinerrific treat. Okay, back to the show. (By the way, I am back from Hawaii this week, and I must say, this dreary weather in NY is just not doing it for me.)