Lee Anne Wong

Lee Anne Wong on the the difficulties of cooking for 60. Oh, and why you must try pig's leg.

on Nov 15, 2006

The duck napoleon leaves quite a bit to be desired (overcooked, and all that puff pastry). The "awakening" palate cleanser is just plain weird. And the dessert doesn't seem like it would taste very good even as separate courses. So one thing you all may not realize is that if you are 5th or 6th course, that means you get an extra TWO HOURS to get your course ready for plating. Which is a wonder to me why they struggled to make and plate three salad dishes as a trio. (That's five hours cooking time. Ridiculous.)

So bye-bye Josie and Marisa. Again, both strong, accomplished women, and quite charming in person, may I add. I just don't think they were cut out for this competition. In closing, one of the reasons that I am so critical of some of these contestants is because of their astounding egos on camera. To be a chef, of course you need to have a sense of oneself, and a bit of an ego. Common sense will tell you that you need to keep that ego in check, especially if the rest of America is watching and you can't back up all of that bravado with some kick-ass food. Some of the best and most respected chefs in the world are the most humble. It is humility, and the understanding that there is always someone out there better than you, that should keep even the best chef motivated to continue learning until the day they die.

The next episode is where I actually join up with the production and in getting to know some of the remaining contestants. I'll tell you right now, the egos get bigger and the drama, as petulant and immature as it will get sometimes, only increases. Great TV. Until next week, go get your pigs' feet on. And for those of you still thinking about my chocolate and bacon cake, stay tuned. I'll eventually relinquish the recipe once my website is up and running.