Jerry Saltz

Jerry defends the show and laments how short he appears on TV.

on Oct 13, 2011

Feelings are more mixed in my crowd. Whenever the show comes up, Peter Schjeldahl, my good friend and New Yorker art critic, sadly shakes his head at me and says, "Jerry, Jerry, Jerry." So let me say something to all those who hate this show and to the many who send me angry-e-mails, post nasty comments on my Facebook Page, tweet mean things about me, or write articles about how this TV show is destroying art: I'm not trying to hurt anything. I get mad at things in the art world too: at idiot billionaires flying mindless millionaire artists to bloated biennials to party down on private yachts; at seven-figure prices paid for derivative dreck that supposedly "critiques the system;" at cuckoo collectors like Adam Lindeman opining in the New York Observer that MoMA's de Kooning show is "dated," "quaint," "bland," and "predictable" and sniffs that he didn't read the great de Kooning bio because "I'm a student of the postmodern philosopher Jacques Derrida…"; at gilded auctions attended by those who get their kicks from being profligate in public; at curators flying from city to city to speak on one other's panels about "The Role of the Curator"; at tenured academics who can't turn the page from 1968. I grant that Work of Art is a light thing at a time when heavy things are afoot. But it doesn't feel destructive, vile, or annoying like these other things do. Okay, maybe it's annoying sometimes.

I never thought seriously of saying no to this show. It gets me out of the house, and stops me from being alone at my computer all the time. I love the free food on-set. I especially love learning how shows like this get made. And I know we're not supposed to say this in the art world, but it's really fun to do. On the selfish side, I'm trying to see if art-criticism can be more elastic and populist. I want to see if criticism can coherently be performed for audiences outside art-land, where we have weird ways of talking that many of us don't actually understand. I'm trying to see if it's possible to have what we always say we want: To have more people look at, appreciate, and be exposed to art, wherever it comes from, however it's seen.

My wife* still hasn't seen a single episode of the thing. It's not that she doesn't approve of it; I'd never do this without her go-ahead. It's just that we're both so busy. Last night she flew to L.A. (Maybe she saw it there.) As with last season, I've no idea how I'll be portrayed. I could be a heavy, a clown, whatever. Last season, the regular judge Jeannie Greenberg was an alpha presence in all judges' discussions. Her TV character came off less smart than she really was. This year she left the series, and I miss her. A lot.