NYC's Historic Carnegie Deli Is About to Close for Good: Get Your Ginormous Pastrami Sandwich Asap

NYC's Historic Carnegie Deli Is About to Close for Good: Get Your Ginormous Pastrami Sandwich Asap

Now where will we go to get our recommended annual allowance of protein in one meal? 

By Aly Walansky

The Carnegie Deli, an institution that has played a huge role in New York City's cultural history—and not just because of the massive pastrami sandwiches that helped make it famous—will be closing at the end of the year.

The midtown Manhattan restaurant opened in 1937 and will serve its last customers on December 31, 2016 (although it will continue to license its name for online product sales).

The deli's giant, world-famous sandwiches include a 4-inch-high tower of pastrami and corned beef named the "Woody Allen," after Carnegie's famous fan. Allen's devotion to the place even led him to include it in his movie, Broadway Danny Rose.

“I’m very sad to close the Carnegie Deli but I’ve reached the time of my life when I need to take a step back,” owner Marian Harper Levine told her team, the New York Post reports.

This end is not entirely a surprise for fans of the deli. After a year-long closure last year due to an illegal gas hookup and a messy divorce between the owner and her husband, the restaurant has seen better days. Still, never has any rough patch in Carnegie history been nearly as final as this one.

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