Did Kim Zolciak-Biermann Just Get Stage Fright?

Did Kim Zolciak-Biermann Just Get Stage Fright?

When it came time for the Don't Be Tardy mom to perform her latest song, her nerves almost got the best of her. Here's advice on how to handle any kind of stage fright in your own life.

By Marianne Garvey

Kim Zolciak-Biermann is getting back on stage — and getting hit with a bout of stage fright. The Don't Be Tardy singer was recently geared up to perform at an event with her family by her side, but choked when a mic failed.

She explained, "It's an overwhelming feeling to walk out and have people screaming, cheering for you. I have no idea what’s going to happen on stage. I have no idea."

We feel you, Kim.

Stage fright (or performance anxiety) can happen to all of us: It can strike in a work meeting or if you have to make a speech or do a presentation in front of others. It can happen in sports, in acting, in so many types of jobs.

"Millions of people suffer from performance anxiety, commonly called 'stage fright.' In fact, most people would rather get the flu than perform," reports WebMD. "Being the center of attention and having all eyes on you can be stressful. Your body reacts to this situation in much the same way as it would if you were being attacked. Your body's 'fight-or-flight' mechanism kicks in, which is why symptoms of stage fright are similar to symptoms that occur when you are in real danger."

That's why dry mouth, trembling, twitching, and nausea can happen. So, it's about redirecting that energy into something that works for you, not against you.

But how?

WebMD explains that practicing over and over helps ease the fright. Limiting caffeine the day of also helps. Actually visualize yourself doing an amazing job. Practice breathing, try to be yourself, and get a good night's sleep.

The Anxiety Coach says there are also tricks to get yourself out of stage fright if you're already in it.

"Performance Anxiety is what happens when you focus on yourself and your anxiety, rather than your presentation or performance. It stems from a tendency to resist and fight your anxiety, rather than to accept and work with it. It's the result of thinking of the performance situation as a threat, rather than a challenge."

The report says to accept that the anxiety is there. Then use it. "Take the emotions and passion you feel for your subject or artistic expression and channel it into your performance. Don't try to 'hold it down.' If you try to suppress it, it will work against you. Express it!"

And about that performance on Don't Be Tardy? Watch how it went in the clip below.

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