Rocco DiSpirito

Rocco thinks the key to any chef's success is making people happy.

on Jun 16, 2011

Cooking for people is a privilege, and for chefs what that really means is making people happy for a living –- and that's the first thing I told the chefs when they walked into my kitchen. I told them that we were throwing a real dinner party, and that I fiercely protect my guests' right to be happy. I said, "If every decision you make is informed by the notion that your job is to make people happy, you will always make the correct decision." The chefs who could demonstrate they shared this value with me got to cook for my guests

So I decided that the first challenge should be chefs preparing their signature dishes, because it's a very revealing process. The chefs get to bring their own handpicked ingredients and cook a dish they are known for and have made a thousand times in a tricked-out, super deluxe kitchen with no limits other than time. 

Today everyone chose a dish with seafood in it. I love seafood but not everyone shares my enthusiasm for sea creatures. Geoff started with a lobster that had one claw in the grave. Yes, I made a big deal over it. A droopy lobster like his is a half-dead lobster. You want them still kicking when they get to the kitchen. And since he brought his own, why not bring the best? Took about three minutes to learn something about his commitment to quality. Lobsters start dying when they leave the tank, because they stop eating and begin to lose weight. I expected more from him. Then when he served it, well, there was some shell in the dish. No one wants to deal with shells at a dinner party. If you're vacationing in Booth Bay Harbor in Maine in July, it's a different story. But if you wore your best suit and tie or your Manolo's to dinner, trust me, you don't want to dismantle crustaceans in front of others. Question: Remove shell or leave shell on the lobster? Answer: Guests will be happier if they don't have to pick apart shells. Like I said the answer is always clear if the intention is right.

Then he undercooked the monkfish. An experienced chef who has cooked monkfish, and more importantly, eaten it, should know monkfish shouldn't be served rare. It's got parasites and isn't tender until its fully cooked, not over-cooked, but fully cooked through. But I liked his demeanor and although it may not have come across on TV, he was actually quite humble and respectful, and the carrot salad was really tasty.