Rocco DiSpirito

Rocco thinks the key to any chef's success is making people happy.

on Jun 16, 2011

J.J. and Geoff got to work creating their own dinner parties, from designing the décor to the to food and service. My good friend, Jes Gordon, was the just the right person to help the chefs execute their vision. She is a genius party planner and a great person! Geoff took the gangster route with liquor crates, model cars, and a pinstripe tablecloth all set against a brick wall -- very '30s Prohibition era.  J.J. chose a Cotton Club-treatment -- classy, natty, and really cool.  J.J.'s scallop was the best signature dish, so J.J. won the challenge and got to choose his room and service time first. That's the advantage of winning the signature dish challenge. He chose the formal dining room and decided to serve second.  It's an interesting choice that could backfire if the guests are tried or a little tipsy by the time you get to serve your food.

Right in the middle of prep, I had to walk in and tell the chefs about my guests' dietary restrictions. They even surprised me. No pork, no alcohol, a vegetarian. I think even I would have been really discouraged at that point. Most of their food was already prepped. I can't believe they had to deal with that just a few hours before dinner. Here's where a chef's mettle is really tested. If, like me, you believe you're job as a chef is to make people happy, then you have to smile, suck it up, and make the changes required.  A few expletives aside, that's exactly what both Geoff and J.J. did. 

Geoff chose the room that's my personal favorite, the terrace, and his dinner went first. He planned a very ambitious five-course meal. It's a great way to show your stuff, but the chefs are only given one hour to serve all their courses (otherwise we'd be there till 5am), and it's a lot to get done in just one hour. He started with the now famous "big ass sea scallops" in tequila. Tequila is a strong flavor and not easy to work with, but if you know what you're doing, you can have some fun with it.  He did both. The dish was sublime. I loved the added detail of serving them in the shell they came out of. And the (un-blended) avocado was a great foil to the sweet scallops. The sweet potato bisque served in a shot glass was inspired; everyone loved it. I almost didn't believe it was intentional. Where Geoff got off track was with the cod. It wasn't black cod like he thought, which was disheartening.  Clearly he was missing a piece of his culinary education if he couldn't pick out black cod in a lineup. He conceived a dish that would have been brilliant for black cod, but unfortunately he didn't actually have black cod. Black cod is rich, sweet, and fatty, while Atlantic cod is very lean and briny, almost polar opposites of each other. It was such a shame, because he was doing so well.

The short ribs, once they got to the table, were delicious. I couldn't believe it; they both picked entrees that take days to cook but pulled it off in few short hours.  I'd have liked to have seen them glazed with the reduced cooking liquid like Marcus pointed out, but those damn short ribs were really good as they were. My guests loved them; that made me very happy.